Still having trouble with leash pulling?

Still having trouble with leash pulling?

Today I am sending you a quick video about why your dog might still be pulling on the lead, despite all the tips and tricks you’ve tried. You can watch it here on Facebook.

Thankfully, if you need more help with this, you can join the Frantic To Focused program and it will have you well and truly covered, even if your dog is pulling and lunging towards other dogs.

To summarise the main reasons dogs keep pulling, here are some quick tips:

Every time the dog moves forward with a tight leash, they feel like they have reached their goal of getting towards where they want to go. This is why the main rule of stopping leash pulling is to never follow the dog when the leash is tight (even from your house to the front door)
If your dog pulls you through the door/gate then why should they stop pulling on the walk? Work on this skill first and don’t leave the house until your dog is calm

Don’t worry about the destination, focus on the journey. When you try to keep your walk routine when your dog hasn’t been trained how to walk politely yet, you are caught in a vicious cycle of reinforcing pulling outside of training times. So use your walking time as training time and don’t worry about making it to a certain point. There might be less scenery to enjoy, but your dog is still getting both physical and mental exercise if you stay in your street for now.

Remember how your dog thinks and you’re half way there!

Woofs and wags

Tenille

PS If you want more guidance with training your dog, check out the Dog Matters Academy here.

Ready to step it up? Choose the premium option and get all the training you could ever need plus access to our member’s only group and monthly live calls.

Who your dog needs?

Who your dog needs?

Do you want to know the psychology behind any dog behaviour so that you can use it to solve any problem behaviour your dog might come up with?

When it boils down to it, if a dog is performing a behaviour, they believe that there is something in it for them. (Kind of like us.)

They might not even be correct in their beliefs, but the belief is there all the same, affecting their behaviour (kind of like us…..)

So with that in mind, we can make the whole concept really simple for solving behaviour problems.

Read more in this article and see how you can apply this tweak to the way you live with your dog.

Tenille

PS If you’re ready to take your dog training to the next step, check out the Dog Matters Academy – you can even start with free video lessons to get you started – http://dogmattersacademy.com

Be prepared

The video I want to highlight for you today is all about how times are changing and how you can be prepared for the new dog training regulations that are spreading around the globe.

It may contain satire and a new invention (remember the Fixer?)

Click here to watch on Youtube – How You Can Be Prepared For New Dog Training Regulations – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mQN1GxbAuDs&feature=youtu.be

Or you can share the Facebook version here – https://www.facebook.com/watch/?v=2180976858894385

Enjoy!

Woofs and wags

Tenille

PS If you want to grab some common sense dog training that really protects your dog you can start free with the Dog Matters Academy here.

Furbabies

Furbabies

Last week I had someone write in asking whether humanising her dogs too much could be the reason she is experiencing behaviour issues.

It got me thinking about the, “furkids,” trend and asking the question – is there really any harm in treating dogs like children? So that’s how I started writing today’s highlighted blog.

And wow, I actually had more trouble than I thought putting my thoughts into words for this one!

Here’s the article with my thoughts on treating dogs like kids – when it’s not okay and when it actually is.

If you like this topic, you might also appreciate the video I did about treating small dogs the same as larger dogs – https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ff72Fh8rs8A

How to get started with training? Try out the free Academy area. You can sign up free and get some sample videos. I suggest this lesson on place training as a great starting point for any dog that needs to learn some manners in and out of the home – access the lesson here.

Tenille

That’s mine! [Resource guarding and goals]

That’s mine! [Resource guarding and goals]

If you’ve ever met a dog that growls over food or other items, you should check out my article. Read the blog post here.

As with many dog issues, one of the most common obstacles I see get in the way of success is rushing the training – the handler wanting to reach the end goal too quickly for the pace of the dog.

Are you familiar with goal setting personally?

They say to break your goals down into small manageable pieces. The same is true with our dogs and our goals for them and their behaviours. Break it down into little achievable pieces and you’ll be amazed how quickly it adds up when you look back on it and see how much progress you’ve made.

Don’t cause yourself unneeded frustration by beating yourself up if you, “fail.”

If you do perceive a failure, see what you can learn from it rather than feeling down about it. Turn it into a lesson!

Until next time, wishing you lots of tail wags and happy cuddles

Tenille

PS If you need other training help with your dog, check out the free section in the Dog Matters Academy here.

Helping Dogs With Anxiety

Helping Dogs With Anxiety

People are spoiling their dogs more than ever. Yet anxiety in dogs is becoming more and more common.

How could this be?

We often have the best intentions when giving our dog freedoms around the house such as freedom to go anywhere on the property whenever they like. But dogs like to be able to predict what is going to happen next. If a dog has no structure, no rules and no training, and too much freedom, this creates anxiety.

Many dog owners pity their anxious dogs and therefore don’t want to put any sort of pressure on them at all, so they don’t tell them what to do. But giving your dog a job can actually decrease anxiety and make your dog happier.

When they know what the rules are and how the household works, they feel more at ease because they can more easily predict what’s going to happen next.

Remember, anxiety comes from not knowing what the outcome is going to be. Think about, when was the last time you were anxious? Did it relate to something where you didn’t know what was going to happen and felt that all or part of it was out of your control?

Let’s consider place training. Putting the dog on their place and teaching them that they have to stay there until their told removes the options of anxiety building behaviours like pacing, barking at the windows at anyone who goes by, reacting, bolting and more. Once the dog accepts that they must stay there, they calm down. Then we can reward the calm.

I really can’t express just how valuable this skill is. I had a client a while back and he had a cattle dog that was so highly strung and was practicing some behaviours that could quickly turn into OCD and escalate.

I ran into this client at dinner recently and he was so happy, raving about how useful the place training had become in their life. If his dog starts to get to wound up, she goes to place, lays down and just calms.

If you want to learn more about managing your dog’s anxiety and decreasing it through place training and other handy training, you know what to do – join Frantic To Focused.

You can also register to my FREE Frantic to Focused Video Series: Click here to sign up.

When Your Dog Is Triggered

When Your Dog Is Triggered

Is there something that triggers your dog?

If your dog has something that, “sets them off,” this is often referred to as a trigger.

I’ve seen dogs go bonkers over cars, bikes, other dogs, children, adults, horses, cows, leaves, trees, surfboards, kites, kangaroos. The lot! And I hear squirrels are quite the distraction in other countries (sadly we don’t have them here. I was so excited to see my first squirrel in the states!)

Regardless of what triggers your dog, the training steps we use are essentially the same.

The first thing we need to do is set your dog up to be successful so we can start rewarding those wins! And we aren’t going to get anything to reward if the dog is too close to their trigger.

Going too close too fast is the number one mistake people make when they are working on this sort of issue.

I repeat, don’t go too close too soon!

What you want to figure out is the distance you need to be before your dog reacts. This is known as the dog’s distance threshold. It might be a few feet. Or it could be the length of a football field. Every dog’s threshold is different.

What you want to do is start working on the issue at the point where your dog knows the trigger is there but is not reacting in an undesirable way.

Then you’re going to reward your dog for calmness when they are aware of the trigger, for looking at it without tensing up or staring (a calm curious look is ok but eye-balling it is not), and when your dog focuses on you and looks to you for guidance.

You can get full training on this in the Frantic To Focused program which you can join now by clicking here.

Just check out what Lesa had to say about the program:

“This Course has been such a help to me with my reactive dog. I have never learned so much or had more success in such a short period of time! This training method really works! Thank you so much !”

Or see what Jill said:

“I LOVE this course! I have been working with Beckham for 2 1/2 years using food and never have gotten the response from him that I am getting now. It has given me more confidence and I know that is transferring down the leash to him.
He loves to work and we are both having fun.”

(we teach in the program how to train with or without food and how to use food correctly)

Join now and see just what you can do with your dog today. Whether your dog is anxious, distracted, reactive, fearful or just confused, I KNOW this program can help you.

You can also register to my FREE Frantic to Focused Video Series: Click here to sign up.